Skip to content

EU-Kommission: booking. com ist ein Gatekeeper im Sinn des Digital Markets Act (DMA)

Die EU-Kommission hat festgestellt, dass booking.com ein Gatekeeper im Sinn des Digital Markets Act (DMA) ist.

Die Pressemitteilung der EU-Kommission:
Commission designates Booking as a gatekeeper and opens a market investigation into X

The European Commission has today designated under the Digital Markets Act (DMA), Booking as a gatekeeper for its online intermediation service Booking.com and decided not to designate X Ads and TikTok Ads. In parallel, the Commission has opened a market investigation to further assess the rebuttal submitted in relation to the online social networking service X.

Today's decisions follow a review process conducted by the Commission after receiving the notifications of the three companies regarding their potential status as gatekeepers on 1 March 2024.

On the basis of Booking's self-assessment submitted on 1 March 2024 that it meets the relevant thresholds, the Commission has established that this core platform service constitutes an important gateway between businesses and consumers.

In parallel, the Commission has opened a market investigation to further assess the rebuttal submitted on 1 March 2024 in relation to the online social networking service X. This rebuttal argues that, despite meeting the thresholds, X does not qualify as a important gateway between businesses and consumers. The investigation should be completed within five months.

Another rebuttal was submitted concerning the online advertising service X Ads. The Commission has concluded that, although X Ads meets the quantitative designation thresholds under the DMA, this core platform service does not qualify as an important gateway. Therefore, the Commission decided not to designate X Ads.

Lastly, the Commission received on 1 March 2024 the notification of ByteDance's online advertising service TikTok Ads, including a rebuttal request. The Commission has concluded that, although TikTok Ads meets the quantitative designation thresholds under the DMA, this core platform service does not qualify as an important gateway. Consequently, the Commission decided not to designate TikTok Ads either.

Next steps for the designated gatekeeper

Following its designation, Booking now has six months to comply with the relevant obligations under the DMA, offering more choice and freedom to end users and fair access of business users to the gatekeeper services. Booking has six months to submit a detailed compliance report in which it outlines how it complies with each of the obligations of the DMA. However, some of the DMA's obligations start applying with immediate effect, for example, the obligation to inform the Commission of any intended concentration in the digital sector.

The Commission will monitor the effective implementation and compliance with these obligations. In case a gatekeeper does not comply with the obligations laid down by the DMA, the Commission can impose fines up to 10% of the company's total worldwide turnover, which can go up to 20% in case of repeated infringements. In case of systematic infringements, the Commission is also empowered to adopt additional remedies such as obliging a gatekeeper to sell a business or parts of it or banning the gatekeeper from acquisitions of additional services related to the systemic non-compliance.

In the future, additional undertakings could submit notifications to the Commission under the DMA, based on their self-assessment with respect to the relevant thresholds. In this context, the Commission maintains constructive discussions with all relevant companies.

Background

The DMA aims to ensure contestable and fair markets in the digital sector. It regulates gatekeepers, which are large digital platforms that provide an important gateway between business users and consumers, whose position can grant them the power to act as bottlenecks in the digital economy.

Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, ByteDance, Meta and Microsoft, the six gatekeepers designated by the Commission on 6 September 2023, had to fully comply with all DMA obligations by 7 March 2024. The Commission assessed the compliance reports setting out gatekeepers' compliance measures, and gathered feedback from stakeholders, including in the context of workshops.

On 25 March 2024, the Commission opened non-compliance investigations into Alphabet's rules on steering in Google Play and self-preferencing on Google Search, Apple's rules on steering in the App Store and the choice screen for Safari, and Meta's “pay or consent model”. The Commission announced additional investigatory steps to gather facts and information in relation to Amazon's self-preferencing and Apple's alternative app distribution and new business model.

On 29 April 2024, the Commission designated Apple's iPadOS, its operating system for tablets, as a gatekeeper under the DMA. Apple now has six months to bring iPadOS in line with the relevant DMA obligations.



EU-Kommission: Verfahren nach dem Digital Markets Act (DMA) wegen möglicher Verstöße gegen Alphabet / Google, Apple and Meta eingeleitet

Die EU-Kommission hat Verfahren nach dem Digital Markets Act (DMA) wegen möglicher Verstöße gegen Alphabet / Google, Apple and Meta eingeleitet.

Die Pressemitteilung der EU-Kommission:
Commission opens non-compliance investigations against Alphabet, Apple and Meta under the Digital Markets Act

Today, the Commission has opened non-compliance investigations under the Digital Markets Act (DMA) into Alphabet's rules on steering in Google Play and self-preferencing on Google Search, Apple's rules on steering in the App Store and the choice screen for Safari and Meta's “pay or consent model”.

The Commission suspects that the measures put in place by these gatekeepers fall short of effective compliance of their obligations under the DMA.

In addition, the Commission has launched investigatory steps relating to Apple's new fee structure for alternative app stores and Amazon's ranking practices on its marketplace. Finally, the Commission has ordered gatekeepers to retain certain documents to monitor the effective implementation and compliance with their obligations.

Alphabet's and Apple's steering rules

The Commission has opened proceedings to assess whether the measures implemented by Alphabet and Apple in relation to their obligations pertaining to app stores are in breach of the DMA. Article 5(4) of the DMA requires gatekeepers to allow app developers to “steer” consumers to offers outside the gatekeepers' app stores, free of charge.

The Commission is concerned that Alphabet's and Apple's measures may not be fully compliant as they impose various restrictions and limitations. These constrain, among other things, developers' ability to freely communicate and promote offers and directly conclude contracts, including by imposing various charges.

Alphabet's measures to prevent self-preferencing

The Commission has opened proceedings against Alphabet, to determine whether Alphabet's display of Google search results may lead to self-preferencing in relation to Google's vertical search services (e.g., Google Shopping; Google Flights; Google Hotels) over similar rival services.

The Commission is concerned that Alphabet's measures implemented to comply with the DMA may not ensure that third-party services featuring on Google's search results page are treated in a fair and non-discriminatory manner in comparison with Alphabet's own services, as required by Article 6(5) of the DMA.

Apple's compliance with user choice obligations

The Commission has opened proceedings against Apple regarding their measures to comply with obligations to (i) enable end users to easily uninstall any software applications on iOS, (ii) easily change default settings on iOS and (iii) prompt users with choice screens which must effectively and easily allow them to select an alternative default service, such as a browser or search engine on their iPhones.

The Commission is concerned that Apple's measures, including the design of the web browser choice screen, may be preventing users from truly exercising their choice of services within the Apple ecosystem, in contravention of Article 6(3) of the DMA.

Meta's “pay or consent” model

Finally, the Commission has opened proceedings against Meta to investigate whether the recently introduced “pay or consent” model for users in the EU complies with Article 5(2) of the DMA which requires gatekeepers to obtain consent from users when they intend to combine or cross-use their personal data across different core platform services.

The Commission is concerned that the binary choice imposed by Meta's “pay or consent” model may not provide a real alternative in case users do not consent, thereby not achieving the objective of preventing the accumulation of personal data by gatekeepers.

Other investigatory and enforcement steps

The Commission is also taking other investigatory steps to gather facts and information to clarify whether:

Amazon may be preferencing its own brand products on the Amazon Store in contravention of Article 6(5) of the DMA, and
Apple's new fee structure and other terms and conditions for alternative app stores and distribution of apps from the web (sideloading) may be defeating the purpose of its obligations under Article 6(4) of the DMA.
The Commission has also adopted five retention orders addressed to Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, Meta, and Microsoft, asking them to retain documents which might be used to assess their compliance with the DMA obligations, so as to preserve available evidence and ensure effective enforcement.

Finally, the Commission has granted Meta an extension of 6 months to comply with the interoperability obligation (Article 7 DMA) for Facebook Messenger. The decision is based on a specific provision in Article 7(3)DMA and follows a reasoned request submitted by Meta. Facebook Messenger remains subject to all other DMA obligations.

Next steps

The Commission intends to conclude the proceedings opened today within 12 months. If warranted following the investigation, the Commission will inform the concerned gatekeepers of its preliminary findings and explain the measures it is considering taking or the gatekeeper should take in order to effectively address the Commission's concerns.

In case of an infringement, the Commission can impose fines up to 10% of the company's total worldwide turnover. Such fines can go up to 20% in case of repeated infringement. Moreover, in case of systematic infringements, the Commission may also adopt additional remedies such as obliging a gatekeeper to sell a business or parts of it, or banning the gatekeeper from acquisitions of additional services related to the systemic non-compliance.

Background

The DMA aims to ensure contestable and fair markets in the digital sector. It regulates gatekeepers, which are large digital platforms that provide an important gateway between business users and consumers, whose position can grant them the power to create a bottleneck in the digital economy.

Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, ByteDance, Meta and Microsoft, the six gatekeepers designated by the Commission in September 2023, had to fully comply with all DMA obligations by 7 March 2024. The Commission has assessed the compliance reports setting out gatekeepers' compliance measures, and gathered feedback from stakeholders, including in the context of workshops.

Today's formal non-compliance proceedings against Alphabet, Apple and Meta have been opened pursuant to Article 20 DMA in conjunction with Articles 13 and 29 DMA for breach of Articles 5(2), 5(4), 6(3) and 6(5) DMA respectively.



Präsiden des EuG lehnt Eilantrag von TikTok / Bytedance gegen Einordnung als Gatekeeper im Sinn des Digital Markets Act (DMA) durch EU-Kommission ab

Präsiden des EuG
Beschluss vom 09.20.2024
T-1077/23
Bytedance / EU-Kommission

Der Präsident des EuG hat den Eilantrag von TikTok / Bytedance gegen die Einordnung als Gatekeeper im Sinn des Digital Markets Act (DMA) durch die EU-Kommission abgelehnt.

Die Pressemitteilung des Gerichts:
Verordnung über digitale Märkte: Der Antrag von ByteDance (TikTok) auf Aussetzung des Beschlusses der Kommission, mit dem ByteDance als Torwächter benannt wird, wird zurückgewiesen

ByteDance hat die Dringlichkeit einer vorläufigen Entscheidung zur Verhinderung eines schweren und nicht wiedergutzumachenden Schadens nicht dargetan.

Die ByteDance Ltd ist eine 2012 in China gegründete nicht operative Holdinggesellschaft, die über lokale Tochtergesellschaften die Unterhaltungsplattform TikTok bereitstellt.

Mit Beschluss vom 5. September 2023 benannte die Kommission ByteDance als Torwächter gemäß der Verordnung über digitale Märkte.

Im November 2023 erhob ByteDance Klage auf Nichtigerklärung dieses Beschlusses. Mit gesondertem Schriftsatz hat sie einen Antrag auf vorläufigen Rechtsschutz gestellt, mit dem sie die Aussetzung des Kommissionsbeschlusses begehrt. Mit seinem heutigen Beschluss weist der Präsident des Gerichts den Antrag von ByteDance auf vorläufigen Rechtsschutz zurück.

ByteDance hat danach nicht dargetan, dass es erforderlich wäre, den streitigen Beschluss bis zum Abschluss des Verfahrens zur Hauptsache auszusetzen, um zu verhindern, dass sie einen schweren und nicht wiedergutzumachenden Schaden erleidet.

ByteDance machte u. a. geltend, dass bei sofortiger Durchführung des streitigen Beschlusses die Gefahr bestehe, dass sonst nicht öffentliche, hochstrategische Informationen über die Praktiken von TikTok bei der Erstellung von Nutzerprofilen verbreitet würden. Diese Informationen würden es, so ByteDance, den Wettbewerbern von TikTok und sonstigen Dritten ermöglichen, über die TikTok betreffenden Geschäftsstrategien in einer Weise informiert zu sein, die ihren Tätigkeiten erheblich abträglich wäre. Ausweislich des heutigen Beschlusses hat ByteDance jedoch weder das Bestehen einer tatsächlichen Gefahr der Verbreitung vertraulicher Informationen noch einen etwaigen schweren und nicht wiedergutzumachenden Schaden infolge einer solchen Gefahr dargetan.

Den Volltext des Beschlusses finden Sie hier:

EU-Kommission: Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, ByteDance, Meta und Microsoft sind Gatekeeper im Sinn des Digital Markets Act (DMA)

Die EU-Kommission hat festgestellt, dass Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, ByteDance, Meta und Microsoft Gatekeeper im Sinn des Digital Markets Act (DMA) sind.

Die Pressemitteilung der EU-Kommission:
Die Europäische Kommission hat heute im Rahmen des Gesetzes über digitale Märkte erstmals sechs Torwächter (Gatekeeper) benannt: Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, ByteDance, Meta und Microsoft. Insgesamt wurden 22 zentrale Plattformdienste, die von Torwächtern bereitgestellt werden, benannt. Die sechs Torwächter haben nun sechs Monate Zeit, um die vollständige Einhaltung der Verpflichtungen gemäß dem Gesetz über digitale Märkte für jeden ihrer benannten zentralen Plattformdienste sicherzustellen.

Im Rahmen des Gesetzes über digitale Märkte kann die Europäische Kommission digitale Plattformen als „Torwächter“ benennen, wenn diese für Unternehmen über zentrale Plattformdienste ein wichtiges Zugangstor zu Verbraucherinnen und Verbrauchern darstellen. Die heutigen Benennungsbeschlüsse sind das Ergebnis einer Überprüfung durch die Kommission über 45 Tage, nachdem Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, ByteDance, Meta, Microsoft und Samsung ihren potenziellen Torwächter-Status mitgeteilt hatten. Insbesondere hat die Kommission den Torwächter-Status für die folgenden zentralen Plattformdienste festgestellt:

Parallel dazu hat die Kommission vier Marktuntersuchungen eingeleitet, um die eingereichten Mitteilungen von Microsoft und Apple weiter zu prüfen, denen zufolge einige ihrer zentralen Plattformdienste nicht als Zugangstore anzusehen sind, obwohl sie die Schwellenwerte erreichen:

Microsoft: Bing, Edge und Microsoft Advertising
Apple: iMessage
Nach dem Gesetz über digitale Märkte soll im Rahmen dieser Untersuchungen festgestellt werden, ob durch eine hinreichend stichhaltige Widerlegung durch die Unternehmen nachgewiesen wird, dass die betreffenden Dienste nicht benannt werden sollten. Die Untersuchung sollte innerhalb von fünf Monaten abgeschlossen werden.

Darüber hinaus hat die Kommission eine Marktuntersuchung eingeleitet, um weiter zu prüfen, ob Apples iPadOS zu den Torwächtern gezählt werden sollte, obwohl es die Schwellenwerte nicht erreicht. Diese Untersuchung im Rahmen des Gesetzes über digitale Märkte sollte innerhalb von höchstens 12 Monaten abgeschlossen werden.

Darüber hinaus kam die Kommission zu dem Schluss, dass Gmail, Outlook.com und Samsung Internet Browser zwar die Schwellenwerte des Gesetzes über digitale Märkte für die Einstufung ihrer Betreiber als Torwächter erreichen, Alphabet, Microsoft und Samsung jedoch hinreichend begründete Argumente dafür vorgelegt haben, dass diese Dienste nicht als Zugangstor für die jeweiligen zentralen Plattformdienste anzusehen sind. Daher beschloss die Kommission, Gmail, Outlook.com und Samsung Internet Browser nicht als zentrale Plattformdienste zu benennen. Dementsprechend wurde Samsung nicht als Torwächter in Bezug auf einen zentralen Plattformdienst eingestuft.

Nächste Schritte für benannte Torwächter
Nach ihrer Benennung haben die Torwächter nun sechs Monate Zeit, um sich an die vollständige Liste der Gebote und Verbote zu halten, die im Gesetz für digitale Märkte vorgesehen sind, sodass Endnutzern und gewerblichen Nutzern der Dienste des Torwächters eine größere Auswahl geboten und mehr Freiheit eingeräumt wird. Einige der Verpflichtungen gelten jedoch direkt ab dem Zeitpunkt der Benennung, z. B. die Verpflichtung, die Kommission über jeden geplanten Zusammenschluss zu unterrichten. Es liegt bei den benannten Unternehmen, die wirksame Einhaltung der Vorschriften zu gewährleisten und nachzuweisen. Zu diesem Zweck müssen sie innerhalb von sechs Monaten einen ausführlichen Compliance-Bericht vorlegen, in dem sie darlegen, wie sie die einzelnen Verpflichtungen des Gesetzes über digitale Märkte erfüllen.

Die Kommission wird die wirksame Umsetzung und Einhaltung dieser Verpflichtungen überwachen. Kommt ein Torwächter den im Gesetz über digitale Märkte festgelegten Verpflichtungen nicht nach, kann die Kommission Geldbußen bis zu einem Höchstbetrag von 10 % des weltweit erzielten Gesamtumsatzes des Unternehmens verhängen, der bei wiederholter Zuwiderhandlung auf bis zu 20 % hochgesetzt werden kann. Im Falle systematischer Zuwiderhandlungen ist die Kommission auch befugt, zusätzliche Abhilfemaßnahmen aufzuerlegen. Beispielsweise kann sie einen Torwächter dazu verpflichten, ein Unternehmen oder Teile davon zu verkaufen, oder sie kann dem Torwächter verbieten, zusätzliche Dienste zu erwerben, die mit der systematischen Nichteinhaltung in Verbindung stehen.

In Zukunft könnten weitere Unternehmen der Kommission auf der Grundlage ihrer Selbstbeurteilung Mitteilungen im Rahmen des Gesetzes über digitale Märkte in Bezug auf die einschlägigen Schwellenwerte übermitteln. In diesem Zusammenhang führt die Kommission konstruktive Gespräche mit allen relevanten Unternehmen.



Hintergrund
Das Gesetz über digitale Märkte soll verhindern, dass Torwächter den Unternehmen und Endnutzern unfaire Bedingungen aufzwingen, und so die Offenheit wichtiger digitaler Märkte gewährleisten.

Zusammen mit dem Gesetz über digitale Märkte schlug die Kommission im Dezember 2020 das Gesetz über digitale Dienste vor, um die negativen Folgen bestimmter Verhaltensweisen von Online-Plattformen, die als digitale Torwächter fungieren, für den EU-Binnenmarkt anzugehen.

Das Gesetz über digitale Märkte, das seit November 2022 in Kraft ist und seit Mai 2023 angewendet wird, zielt darauf ab, bestreitbare und faire Märkte im digitalen Sektor zu gewährleisten. Es reguliert die sogenannten Torwächter: große Online-Plattformen, die gewerblichen Nutzern als wichtiges Zugangstor zu Verbrauchern dienen und die aufgrund dieser Stellung die Macht haben, den Marktzugang in der digitalen Wirtschaft zu kanalisieren.

Unternehmen, die mindestens einen der zehn im Gesetz über digitale Märkte aufgeführten zentralen Plattformdienste betreiben, werden als Torwächter angesehen, wenn sie die nachstehenden Kriterien erfüllen. Zu diesen zentralen Plattformdiensten gehören Online-Vermittlungsdienste wie Dienste zum Herunterladen von Computer- oder Handy-Apps, Online-Suchmaschinen, soziale Netzwerke, bestimmte Kommunikationsdienste, Video-Sharing-Plattform-Dienste, virtuelle Assistenten, Webbrowser, Cloud-Computing-Dienste, Betriebssysteme, Online-Marktplätze und Online-Werbedienste. Ein Unternehmen kann dabei auch für mehrere zentrale Plattformdienste als Torwächter benannt werden.

Es gibt drei quantitative Hauptkriterien, die die Annahme begründen, dass ein Unternehmen ein Torwächter im Sinne des Gesetzes über digitale Märkte ist: i) Das Unternehmen erzielt einen bestimmten Jahresumsatz im Europäischen Wirtschaftsraum und erbringt in mindestens drei EU-Mitgliedstaaten einen zentralen Plattformdienst, ii) das Unternehmen betreibt einen zentralen Plattformdienst mit monatlich mehr als 45 Millionen aktiven Endnutzern, die in der EU niedergelassen sind oder sich dort aufhalten, und mit jährlich mehr als 10 000 aktiven gewerblichen Nutzern mit Niederlassung in der EU und iii) das Unternehmen hat das zweite Kriterium in den drei vorhergehenden Geschäftsjahren erfüllt.

Im Gesetz über digitale Märkte ist eine Reihe spezifischer Verpflichtungen festgelegt, die Torwächter einhalten müssen, und bestimmte Verhaltensweisen werden ihnen untersagt mithilfe einer Liste von Geboten und Verboten.

Mit dem Gesetz über digitale Märkte wird der Kommission auch die Befugnis übertragen, Marktuntersuchungen durchzuführen, um i) Unternehmen aus qualitativen Gründen als Torwächter zu benennen, ii) die Verpflichtungen für Torwächter erforderlichenfalls zu aktualisieren, iii) Abhilfemaßnahmen zu konzipieren, mit denen gegen systematische Zuwiderhandlungen gegen die Vorschriften des Gesetzes über digitale Märkte vorgegangen wird.


Weitere Informationen finden Sie hier: